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August, 2014

Time inevitably brings change. More than six and a half years after Radiology Daily began, this is the final post. Don’t worry! Launching next month will be a free, time-saving monthly e-newsletter, Oakstone’s new Highlights in Radiology. Here’s a taste of what you’ll get:

Insights from respected colleagues in the field of radiology and diagnostic imaging
Physician reviews of—and commentary on—radiology-related articles from … read more »

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A health-insurance company’s “price transparency program” succeeded in driving insured patients to less-expensive MRI facilities and away from hospital-based facilities, according to an article in the current edition of Health Affairs.

The insurer was WellPoint. One of its subsidiaries commissioned the study, and another conducted it. The study looked at more than 100,000 members of WellPoint health plans from 2010 through 2012. … read more »

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MRI-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound noninvasively destroyed a benign bone tumor in the leg of a Canadian teenager. That night, for the first time in months, he was able to sleep without being jolted awake by excruciating pain.

The July 17 treatment by a team from The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto was the North American debut of the procedure for … read more »

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Studies are defining an ever-larger role for MRI in detecting prostate cancer. One of the most recent, performed by Australian researchers, found MRI to be 97 percent effective in ruling out prostate cancer for men with abnormal prostate specific antigen levels or digital rectal exam results.

Lead Investigator Phillip Stricker, MBBS, senior author of an article about the research in the … read more »

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The surprisingly rapid spread of digital breast tomosynthesis, also known as 3-D mammography, may be an unintended—but beneficial—consequence of hospital consolidation.

Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is costly, partly because one manufacturer, Hologic, has the U.S. market to itself (although it will likely soon have competition from GE and Siemens, which sell 3-D mammography systems in Europe). A large, consolidated health care … read more »

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Suddenly, everybody’s talking about CT scans of ancient mummies. Well, maybe not everybody. But the journal Global Heart, published by the World Heart Federation, devoted most of its June issue to, as the title of the Editor’s Page article put it, “What Do Mummies Tell Us About Atherosclerosis?” NPR’s health blog, Shots, also weighed in last week.

It’s not news that CT scans have … read more »

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Two new handheld optical imaging devices can detect and measure the extent of skin cancer tumors, particularly melanoma, say their developers.

One packs three different spectroscopic techniques—Raman spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy—into a single probe the size of a pen, connected to supporting equipment on a portable utility cart. In about four and a half seconds, it can … read more »

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An algorithm developed at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center in Rochester, Minnesota, significantly reduces the use of CT scans for children with suspected appendicitis without affecting diagnostic accuracy, according to a study published online in Surgery.

The study looked at 331 emergency-department pediatric patients (18 or younger) who underwent appendectomies for suspected appendicitis. Of the patients, 41 percent were treated in the two years … read more »

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A new technology that can create an “acoustic bottle” in midair could improve ultrasound imaging, according to researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. The  technique also shows promise in a number of more exotic fields, including acoustic cloaking, particle manipulation, and levitation.

Peng Zhang, PhD, lead author of a paper about the research, … read more »

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CT scans can guide not only the treatment of injured people but also the repair of damaged musical instruments, thanks to 3-D printers. Researchers at the University of Connecticut have been using CT to look deep inside antique instruments and even print replacement parts.

They got the idea from Robert S. Howe, MD, a gynecologist and reproductive endocrinologist in East Longmeadow, … read more »

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