Have an account? Please log in.
Text size: Small font Default font Larger font
.
Radiology Daily
Radiology Daily PracticalReviews.com Radiology Daily

Cardiac Imaging

Cardiovascular, or cardiac imaging, is increasingly popular as a diagnostic aid. Cardiac cat scan, MR, and PET in cardiac diagnosis are increasingly relevant modalities in the cardiology and nuclear medicine communities. This trend is leading to a critical demand for MRI cardiac imaging and cardiac scan imaging services.

    Next Page »
.

Features from this Topic

Time inevitably brings change. More than six and a half years after Radiology Daily began, this is the final post. Don’t worry! Launching next month will be a free, time-saving monthly e-newsletter, Oakstone’s new Highlights in Radiology. Here’s a taste of what you’ll get:

Insights from respected colleagues in the field of radiology and diagnostic imaging
Physician reviews of—and commentary on—radiology-related articles from … read more »

Related

  • No Related Posts

A health-insurance company’s “price transparency program” succeeded in driving insured patients to less-expensive MRI facilities and away from hospital-based facilities, according to an article in the current edition of Health Affairs.

The insurer was WellPoint. One of its subsidiaries commissioned the study, and another conducted it. The study looked at more than 100,000 members of WellPoint health plans from 2010 through 2012. … read more »

Related

  • No Related Posts

Suddenly, everybody’s talking about CT scans of ancient mummies. Well, maybe not everybody. But the journal Global Heart, published by the World Heart Federation, devoted most of its June issue to, as the title of the Editor’s Page article put it, “What Do Mummies Tell Us About Atherosclerosis?” NPR’s health blog, Shots, also weighed in last week.

It’s not news that CT scans have … read more »

Related

  • No Related Posts

Astronauts are going to be taking ultrasound images of their arteries while in space as part of a long-term study of oxidative stress and inflammation caused by the conditions of space flight. The results could help workers back on Earth whose jobs can put them at risk of similar problems.

Oxidative stress involves an imbalance in the body’s ability to handle … read more »

Related

  • No Related Posts

The discovery by University of Wisconsin researchers of genes that are necessary for surviving high levels of radiation has potentially big implications for imaging and radiation therapy.

The researchers developed a highly radiation–resistant strain of Escherichia coli by exposing cultures of the bacterium to extreme doses of radiation. “We blasted the cultures until 99 percent of the bacteria were dead,” said Michael M. … read more »

Related

  • No Related Posts

Big price increases for two radiotracers have led imaging facilities to look for alternatives, with at least some success. The tracers are used in ventilation/perfusion scans of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism.

As we reported in May, Jubilant DraxImage of Montreal increased the prices of macroaggregated albumin (MAA) and diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA). The company is the sole North American manufacturer of both. … read more »

Related

  • No Related Posts

In emergency department treatment of stroke patients, every second counts. Practice guidelines recommend giving ischemic stroke patients a clot-busting tPA injection within 60 minutes. So which takes longer: getting patients in the door and ready for imaging (door-to-imaging time, or DIT), or getting patients imaged and, if they’re suffering from ischemic stroke, giving them tPA (imaging-to-needle time, or ITN)?

Surprisingly, it’s … read more »

Related

  • No Related Posts

A new method of creating radioisotopes could not only eliminate the chronic shortages that the medical world has faced in recent years but also lead to new types of medical imaging and nuclear medicine therapy, according to one of the technique’s developers.

Mark Raizen, PhD, professor of physics at the University of Texas at Austin, is senior editor of an article … read more »

Related

  • No Related Posts

State regulation of radiologic technologists has “little impact on public health and safety” and should be abolished, according to a staff report of an agency of the Texas Legislature.

Christine Lung, vice president of government relations and public policy for the American Society of Radiologic Technologists, begs to differ:
Everyone knows that radiation is a carcinogen. If performed incorrectly, it’s a direct … read more »

Related

  • No Related Posts

Newer CT scanners drastically reduce the amount of radiation exposure for patients, according to a new study that involved nine sites in the United States and Saudi Arabia.

The researchers compared radiation exposure from first-generation 64-slice single-source and dual-source scanners to that from the new generation of 128-slice dual-source scanners with high-pitch capability. The newer machines reduced overall dosage by 61 … read more »

Related

  • No Related Posts
    Next Page »
.

Would you like to keep current with radiological news and information?