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Emergency Radiology

Emergency radiology is devoted to diagnostic imaging of emergency trauma and non-traumatic emergency conditions. Emergency radiology is a subspecialty recognized by the American College of Radiology that advances diagnosis and treatment of acutely ill or injured patients by means of medical imaging.

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Features from this Topic

Time inevitably brings change. More than six and a half years after Radiology Daily began, this is the final post. Don’t worry! Launching next month will be a free, time-saving monthly e-newsletter, Oakstone’s new Highlights in Radiology. Here’s a taste of what you’ll get:

Insights from respected colleagues in the field of radiology and diagnostic imaging
Physician reviews of—and commentary on—radiology-related articles from … read more »

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An algorithm developed at Mayo Clinic Children’s Center in Rochester, Minnesota, significantly reduces the use of CT scans for children with suspected appendicitis without affecting diagnostic accuracy, according to a study published online in Surgery.

The study looked at 331 emergency-department pediatric patients (18 or younger) who underwent appendectomies for suspected appendicitis. Of the patients, 41 percent were treated in the two years … read more »

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A new technology that can create an “acoustic bottle” in midair could improve ultrasound imaging, according to researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. The  technique also shows promise in a number of more exotic fields, including acoustic cloaking, particle manipulation, and levitation.

Peng Zhang, PhD, lead author of a paper about the research, … read more »

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The discovery by University of Wisconsin researchers of genes that are necessary for surviving high levels of radiation has potentially big implications for imaging and radiation therapy.

The researchers developed a highly radiation–resistant strain of Escherichia coli by exposing cultures of the bacterium to extreme doses of radiation. “We blasted the cultures until 99 percent of the bacteria were dead,” said Michael M. … read more »

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Big price increases for two radiotracers have led imaging facilities to look for alternatives, with at least some success. The tracers are used in ventilation/perfusion scans of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism.

As we reported in May, Jubilant DraxImage of Montreal increased the prices of macroaggregated albumin (MAA) and diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA). The company is the sole North American manufacturer of both. … read more »

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In emergency department treatment of stroke patients, every second counts. Practice guidelines recommend giving ischemic stroke patients a clot-busting tPA injection within 60 minutes. So which takes longer: getting patients in the door and ready for imaging (door-to-imaging time, or DIT), or getting patients imaged and, if they’re suffering from ischemic stroke, giving them tPA (imaging-to-needle time, or ITN)?

Surprisingly, it’s … read more »

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Two new studies look at imaging-related lessons from the April 2013 terrorist bombing attack during the Boston Marathon—one of interest to post-traumatic stress disorder researchers, and the other of concern primarily to radiologists and the institutions where they practice.

The bombing presented an unanticipated opportunity for a group of researchers who had performed functional MRI brain scans on Boston-area teenagers for … read more »

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Mayo Clinic and 10 other institutions from around the United States are leading an effort to institute a national protocol to limit radiation dosage when imaging children.

Representatives of the institutions published an invited commentary titled “An Appeal for Safe and Appropriate Imaging of Children” online last week in Journal of Patient Safety. Lead author Stephen J. Swensen, MD, a radiologist at … read more »

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Even loss of consciousness from a blow to the head is not by itself reason enough to give a child a cranial CT scan, according to research published online Monday in JAMA Pediatrics.

Nathan Kuppermann, MD, senior author of the article and principal investigator for the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN), from which the article’s data and analysis were derived, summarized the research … read more »

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An optical brain-imaging device could be a cheap, portable way of diagnosing concussions on the athletic field—or the battlefield—a preliminary study suggests.

The device uses functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) via a three-pound band that’s strapped around the head. The “headcap” measures the flow and oxygenation of the blood as subjects take a computerized neurocognition test. University of Pittsburgh Schools of the … read more »

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