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Medical Ethics

Contains articles on Medical Ethics issues arising in the field of Radiology.

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Time inevitably brings change. More than six and a half years after Radiology Daily began, this is the final post. Don’t worry! Launching next month will be a free, time-saving monthly e-newsletter, Oakstone’s new Highlights in Radiology. Here’s a taste of what you’ll get:

Insights from respected colleagues in the field of radiology and diagnostic imaging
Physician reviews of—and commentary on—radiology-related articles from … read more »

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One of the things holding back wider acceptance of low-dose CT screening for lung cancer has been the high false-positive rate—between 20 and 50 percent. But a study published online Friday in Cancer indicates that false positives don’t seem to bother those being screened. The lesson, apparently, is to emphasize the “informed” part of informed consent.

Ilana F. Gareen, PhD, lead author … read more »

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Knowing patients’ risk profiles can make radiologists’ readings of screening mammograms more accurate—depending on whether the profile information is given the proper weight and delivered at the proper time.

That’s the conclusion of research presented at a conference last week by Mehmet U. S. Ayvaci, PhD, assistant professor of information systems and operations management at the Naveen Jindal School of Management at … read more »

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A new algorithm greatly reduces radiation exposure from chest CT scans, making it a good choice for screening people who have been exposed to asbestos … except for a possible problem with what researchers called the “unusual appearance” of the images.

Chest CT is often used for lung cancer screening of asbestos-exposed subjects. But it exposes patients to higher radiation doses … read more »

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Newer CT scanners drastically reduce the amount of radiation exposure for patients, according to a new study that involved nine sites in the United States and Saudi Arabia.

The researchers compared radiation exposure from first-generation 64-slice single-source and dual-source scanners to that from the new generation of 128-slice dual-source scanners with high-pitch capability. The newer machines reduced overall dosage by 61 … read more »

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Imaging gets prominent mention in the much-talked-about article “Measuring Low-Value Care in Medicine,” published online Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine.

The article concludes that 26 “low-value” procedures cost Medicare anywhere from $1.9 billion (using its most specific measures, minimizing false positives) to $8.5 billion (using its most sensitive measures, minimizing false negatives) in 2009. It summed up its contentions thus:
In this national … read more »

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John L. Ulmer, MD, doesn’t mince words when he discusses the implications of a new study about radiology and electronic health records that was published in this month’s issue of Health Affairs:
In my mind, it would be below the standard of care to practice radiology and to interpret imaging studies without access to the EHR.
Dr. Ulmer is professor of radiology and director … read more »

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Doctors from opposing sides of the mammogram debate have jointly called for more involvement by individual women in decisions about whether they should receive screening mammograms.

At the World Congress on the Menopause, which took place Thursday through Sunday in Cancun, Mexico, Eugenio Paci, MD, of the Institute for the Study and Prevention of Cancer in Florence, Italy, presented findings from … read more »

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You might think a false-positive result from a mammogram would make women shy away from the procedure. However, according to a new study published online this week in JAMA Internal Medicine, women who had received mammogram false positives actually expressed more willingness to go for future breast cancer screening than those who had not.

False positives did increase anxiety, but not … read more »

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A new European study with significant ethical implications found that brain imaging did a good job of identifying the patients in a vegetative or minimally conscious state who would eventually return to full consciousness.

An article about the research was published online last week in The Lancet. The journal also published an accompanying commentary that explored some ramifications of the study. For … read more »

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