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Musculoskeletal Radiology

Musculoskeletal radiology is a subspecialty concerned with the diagnostic radiology of diseases of the muscles and skeleton. In recent years, MRI musculoskeletal imaging for the assessment of bone disease has been joined by advances in ultrasonography, scintigraphy, and computed tomography.

Features from this Topic

A new method of creating radioisotopes could not only eliminate the chronic shortages that the medical world has faced in recent years but also lead to new types of medical imaging and nuclear medicine therapy, according to one of the technique’s developers.

Mark Raizen, PhD, professor of physics at the University of Texas at Austin, is senior editor of an article … read more »

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State regulation of radiologic technologists has “little impact on public health and safety” and should be abolished, according to a staff report of an agency of the Texas Legislature.

Christine Lung, vice president of government relations and public policy for the American Society of Radiologic Technologists, begs to differ:
Everyone knows that radiation is a carcinogen. If performed incorrectly, it’s a direct … read more »

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Newer CT scanners drastically reduce the amount of radiation exposure for patients, according to a new study that involved nine sites in the United States and Saudi Arabia.

The researchers compared radiation exposure from first-generation 64-slice single-source and dual-source scanners to that from the new generation of 128-slice dual-source scanners with high-pitch capability. The newer machines reduced overall dosage by 61 … read more »

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An international team of researchers has found a way to make iron oxide nanoparticles behave usefully for both MRI imaging and treatment of tumors: encase them inside larger silicon and polymer particles.

That creates versatile iron oxide composites that can act as MRI contrast agents, be manipulated with magnets, be heated, and degrade quickly. Normally, you would need different sizes of … read more »

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A breakthrough at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California, could lead to high-frequency ultrasound imaging with up to 1,000 times higher resolution than today’s medical ultrasounds.

Xiang Zhang, PhD, summed up the research this way:
We have demonstrated optical coherent manipulation and detection of the acoustic phonons in nanostructures that offer new possibilities in the development … read more »

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CT scans have made possible the re-creation of one of the most famous spines in history: that of Richard III, king of England from 1483 to 1485 and the subject of one of the most scathing plays in Shakespeare’s canon.

Shakespeare devotes an entire play to the king’s perfidies. The character also appears villainously in some of the Bard’s other history … read more »

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Is cancer mostly a modern disease, attributable to such unhealthy habits as smoking and spending too much time on the couch?

X-rays and a scanning electron microscope have revealed metastatic cancer in multiple bones of a skeleton that’s more than 3,000 years old. The find provides evidence that the answer to that question is “yes, but,” according to a study published … read more »

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University of Michigan researchers may finally have figured out how to use terahertz rays for imaging—by converting them into ultrasound.

The terahertz band lies between microwaves and infrared light on the electromagnetic spectrum. (From left to right, longer to shorter wavelengths, the spectrum is radio waves, microwaves, terahertz waves, infrared waves, visible light waves, ultraviolet waves, X-rays, and gamma rays.) We’ve … read more »

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If everything goes right, a new radioisotope plant will open in Columbia, Missouri, right about the time North America’s major source of radioisotopes is scheduled to shut down for good.

Last week, Northwest Medical Isotopes of Corvallis, Oregon, announced plans to open a $50 million facility to produce molybdenum-99 at the University of Missouri’s Discovery Ridge Research Park in Columbia. That … read more »

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Imaging gets prominent mention in the much-talked-about article “Measuring Low-Value Care in Medicine,” published online Monday in JAMA Internal Medicine.

The article concludes that 26 “low-value” procedures cost Medicare anywhere from $1.9 billion (using its most specific measures, minimizing false positives) to $8.5 billion (using its most sensitive measures, minimizing false negatives) in 2009. It summed up its contentions thus:
In this national … read more »

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