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Nuclear Medicine

Nuclear medicine uses radioactive substances in diagnosis and therapy. Nuclear breast imaging (also called scintimammography) is a supplemental breast exam that may be used in some patients to investigate a breast abnormality after diagnostic mammography has been performed. Nuclear breast imaging uses small amounts of radioactive materials, or radiopharmaceuticals, to do diagnostic scans of the breast.

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Features from this Topic

Time inevitably brings change. More than six and a half years after Radiology Daily began, this is the final post. Don’t worry! Launching next month will be a free, time-saving monthly e-newsletter, Oakstone’s new Highlights in Radiology. Here’s a taste of what you’ll get:

Insights from respected colleagues in the field of radiology and diagnostic imaging
Physician reviews of—and commentary on—radiology-related articles from … read more »

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A new, noninvasive technique combining photoacoustic imaging, a nanoscale contrast agent, and PET should provide much-improved functional imaging of the intestine, according to a paper published this month in Nature Nanotechnology.

Jonathan F. Lovell, PhD, senior author of the article, said tests of the new technique on mice look promising:
We could potentially induce a paradigm shift that allows for much more routine … read more »

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The emerging field of radiomics—the extraction and analysis of “hidden” data from large amounts of medical images—could help doctors more accurately choose the precise radiation therapy doses necessary to kill tumors, according to a study presented today at the 56th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine in Austin, Texas.

Joseph O. Deasy, PhD, senior author of the … read more »

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The discovery by University of Wisconsin researchers of genes that are necessary for surviving high levels of radiation has potentially big implications for imaging and radiation therapy.

The researchers developed a highly radiation–resistant strain of Escherichia coli by exposing cultures of the bacterium to extreme doses of radiation. “We blasted the cultures until 99 percent of the bacteria were dead,” said Michael M. … read more »

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Big price increases for two radiotracers have led imaging facilities to look for alternatives, with at least some success. The tracers are used in ventilation/perfusion scans of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism.

As we reported in May, Jubilant DraxImage of Montreal increased the prices of macroaggregated albumin (MAA) and diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA). The company is the sole North American manufacturer of both. … read more »

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A new method of creating radioisotopes could not only eliminate the chronic shortages that the medical world has faced in recent years but also lead to new types of medical imaging and nuclear medicine therapy, according to one of the technique’s developers.

Mark Raizen, PhD, professor of physics at the University of Texas at Austin, is senior editor of an article … read more »

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State regulation of radiologic technologists has “little impact on public health and safety” and should be abolished, according to a staff report of an agency of the Texas Legislature.

Christine Lung, vice president of government relations and public policy for the American Society of Radiologic Technologists, begs to differ:
Everyone knows that radiation is a carcinogen. If performed incorrectly, it’s a direct … read more »

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If everything goes right, a new radioisotope plant will open in Columbia, Missouri, right about the time North America’s major source of radioisotopes is scheduled to shut down for good.

Last week, Northwest Medical Isotopes of Corvallis, Oregon, announced plans to open a $50 million facility to produce molybdenum-99 at the University of Missouri’s Discovery Ridge Research Park in Columbia. That … read more »

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Two radiotracers commonly used in lung scans have received huge price increases—in one case, a hike of more than 2,000 percent.

Jubilant DraxImage of Montreal, Canada, has increased the prices of macroaggregated albumin (MAA) and diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA). Both are used for ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) lung scans, which are most often performed in cases of suspected pulmonary embolism.

Mark Tulchinsky, MD, of Penn … read more »

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A new European study with significant ethical implications found that brain imaging did a good job of identifying the patients in a vegetative or minimally conscious state who would eventually return to full consciousness.

An article about the research was published online last week in The Lancet. The journal also published an accompanying commentary that explored some ramifications of the study. For … read more »

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