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Alert Archive by Date

August, 2014

You may have seen them popping up in storefronts, with such names as O Baby, Baby Preview, Sneak a Peek, and Belly Love Spa. They’re ultrasound boutiques, where mothers-to-be can get 3-D and real-time 4-D images of their unborn babies, sometimes with such available extras as baby clothes or spa treatments.

Are such businesses just a sweet way for parents and … read more »

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July, 2014

A new, noninvasive technique combining photoacoustic imaging, a nanoscale contrast agent, and PET should provide much-improved functional imaging of the intestine, according to a paper published this month in Nature Nanotechnology.

Jonathan F. Lovell, PhD, senior author of the article, said tests of the new technique on mice look promising:
We could potentially induce a paradigm shift that allows for much more routine … read more »

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Go big or stay small? Two New Jersey radiology practices found a third way: joining in a partnership that allows them to remain independent but work cooperatively and maximize the amount of today’s hottest commodity in business—data.

The practices are Advanced Radiology Solutions of Toms River and Navesink Radiology of Red Bank. “We were all looking to maintain our independence while … read more »

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An MRI scan apparently cost a San Diego teenager $6.5 million earlier this month. The youngster, 17-year-old Brady Aiken, graduated this spring from San Diego’s Cathedral Catholic High School, where he pitched on the baseball team. He pitched so well, in fact, he pitched that the Houston Astros made him the very first pick in Major League Baseball’s annual First-Year … read more »

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One of the things holding back wider acceptance of low-dose CT screening for lung cancer has been the high false-positive rate—between 20 and 50 percent. But a study published online Friday in Cancer indicates that false positives don’t seem to bother those being screened. The lesson, apparently, is to emphasize the “informed” part of informed consent.

Ilana F. Gareen, PhD, lead author … read more »

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Astronauts are going to be taking ultrasound images of their arteries while in space as part of a long-term study of oxidative stress and inflammation caused by the conditions of space flight. The results could help workers back on Earth whose jobs can put them at risk of similar problems.

Oxidative stress involves an imbalance in the body’s ability to handle … read more »

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Stress in early childhood is associated with subtle differences in brain structure that can have significant negative effects on behavior, health, and other aspects of later life, according to a new study led by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers.

The differences in the size of the hippocampus and amygdala were so small that the researchers had to hand-trace around the structures in … read more »

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The emerging field of radiomics—the extraction and analysis of “hidden” data from large amounts of medical images—could help doctors more accurately choose the precise radiation therapy doses necessary to kill tumors, according to a study presented today at the 56th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine in Austin, Texas.

Joseph O. Deasy, PhD, senior author of the … read more »

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The discovery by University of Wisconsin researchers of genes that are necessary for surviving high levels of radiation has potentially big implications for imaging and radiation therapy.

The researchers developed a highly radiation–resistant strain of Escherichia coli by exposing cultures of the bacterium to extreme doses of radiation. “We blasted the cultures until 99 percent of the bacteria were dead,” said Michael M. … read more »

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Big price increases for two radiotracers have led imaging facilities to look for alternatives, with at least some success. The tracers are used in ventilation/perfusion scans of patients with suspected pulmonary embolism.

As we reported in May, Jubilant DraxImage of Montreal increased the prices of macroaggregated albumin (MAA) and diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA). The company is the sole North American manufacturer of both. … read more »

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